Hip Pain and Injury in Yoga

By Niki Vetten

Hips are vital in all body movements because the body’s centre of gravity is located in the hip area, about 4 finger-widths below the navel or belly-button. Healthy hips are also the key to a pain-free lower back and knees.

Flexibility in the hips is determined by strength and overstretching the hips in an effort to make them flexible will instead make the hips weak and dysfunctional. Muscle imbalances in the hips also lead to inflexibility in the legs – it’s common for people with hip problems on one side to have one flexible leg and one that is inflexible.

When hips become painful in yoga practice, it is usually time to consult a Biokineticist, because hip muscle imbalances need specific corrective exercises, based on an assessment of your hip-function. If hips are left untreated, pain often spreads into the lower back and the neck and shoulder area. It is very easy to develop hip-muscle imbalances with yoga, as a result of:

Strength differences between the left and right hip occurs naturally because most of us have a dominant hand that we use. Hand movements are stabilised by the shoulders, which are in turn stabilised by the diagonally opposite hip. Therefore, people who use their right hand usually have a stronger left hip. Left-handed people often have more balanced bodies because many of the objects that they use in their day-to-day lives are designed for right-handed users, so they are forced to use both hands. Hip injury and dysfunction tends to occur in the weaker hip and so right-handed yogis tend to have problems with their right hip, because it is naturally their weaker hip.

When you have a strength or structural difference between the left and right hips, the pelvis tends to tilt to one side – it is higher on the weaker side, this will affect the body’s alignment and is one cause of lower-back and neck pain. This is referred to as lateral pelvic tilt.

Although asana practice is usually equal on both sides of the body, it can be helpful to pay more attention to the weaker side, because practising asanas equally will not correct any existing left-right imbalance, but will perpetuate it instead.

I will look at other the other factors which contribute to hip problems in separate posts.

Reading sources: Kendall, McCreary, Provance, 1993, Muscles, Testing and Function

Author: Niki Vetten

View Profile

Visit Niki’s Website: Yoga Anatomy for the Perplexed

Here are some of the other articles posted here by Nikki Vetten:
  • Hamstring Injury, Sciatica and Sacroiliac Pain in Yoga March 10, 2013 By Niki Vetten There are three muscles in the legs that are collectively referred to as the Hamstrings – the Biceps Femoris, Semitendinosus and Semimembranosus. All three Hamstrings attach to the Ischial Tuberosity of the pelvis – the sit-bone. At the knee, the Biceps Femoris attaches to the outside of the Femur and the knee and ...
  • Knees and Padmasana March 9, 2013 By Niki Vetten Padmasana can cause various problems for yoga practitioners. Meniscus tears usually occur as a result of falls and accidents but in yoga they can be caused by incorrect functioning of the Popliteus and Semimembranosus (inner hamstring). Both of these muscles control rotational forces in the leg. The Popliteus muscle retracts the lateral meniscus, ...
  • Neck Pain from the Hips March 12, 2013 By Niki Vetten Posture affects our necks negatively when there is anterior or posterior pelvic tilt because the spinal curves are altered and the head is carried in a forward position. The muscle at the front of the neck, the Sternocleidomastoideus (SCM) shortens and the shoulder girdle rounds and shifts forward, exaggerating the curvature of the ...
  • Back Flexibility with Yoga March 11, 2013 By Niki Vetten As we get older our spines bend less, mostly because of the effects of gravity on the spinal discs, which begin to dehydrate and become compressed after 30, reducing the spaces between the facet joints in the vertebrae and limiting movement. Gravity and an upright human posture also causes some the spinal muscles ...
  • Movement Habits and their Effect on Yoga Practice March 11, 2013 By Niki Vetten There are three particular movement habits in asana practice that either cause or indicate problems with the hips: These will be covered in detail in separate posts, to keep posts shorter 1. Allowing the hip to push out to the side and not maintaining a level pelvis in the horizontal plane – lateral pelvic ...
View more articles by Niki

You may also like...

Leave a Reply

Error: Please enter a valid email address

Error: Invalid email

Error: Please enter your first name

Error: Please enter your last name

Error: Please enter a username

Error: Please enter a password

Error: Please confirm your password

Error: Password and password confirmation do not match